Twitter At A Glance

Apologies for the delay in posting! This last semester of grad school is keeping me extra busy, and this last week has been a doozy. I’m back on track now, though, hoping to post once a week again.

Today on Twitter I found this lovely “Twitter At a Glance” as retweeted by @ShannonMMiller via @GwynethJones aka the Daring Librarian. Anyhow, it is a great “how to” twitter guide in comic form, so I’m sharing it here.

Twitter at a glance how to guide

Image courtesy of  The Daring Librarian on Flickr, posted under a Creative Commons License.

Banned Books Week 2010: Banned Classics

Banned Books Week is September 25 – October 2 2010.

Did you know that 46 of the Radcliffe Publishing Course Top 100 Novels of the 20th Century have been the target of ban attempts?

The books in bold are known to have been banned or challenged. For information on why these books were banned, visit the ALA website, where this list appears.

1. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
2. The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger
3. The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck
4. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
5. The Color Purple, by Alice Walker
6. Ulysses, by James Joyce
7. Beloved, by Toni Morrison
8. The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding
9. 1984, by George Orwell
10. The Sound and the Fury, by William Faulkner
11. Lolita, by Vladmir Nabokov
12. Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck

13. Charlotte’s Web, by E.B. White
14. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, by James Joyce
15. Catch-22, by Joseph Heller
16. Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
17. Animal Farm, by George Orwell

18. The Sun Also Rises, by Ernest Hemingway
19. As I Lay Dying, by William Faulkner
20. A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway
21. Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad
22. Winnie-the-Pooh, by A.A. Milne
23. Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston
24. Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison
25. Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison
26. Gone with the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell
27. Native Son, by Richard Wright
28. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, by Ken Kesey
29. Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
30. For Whom the Bell Tolls, by Ernest Hemingway
31. On the Road, by Jack Kerouac
32. The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway
33. The Call of the Wild, by Jack London
34. To the Lighthouse, by Virginia Woolf
35. Portrait of a Lady, by Henry James
36. Go Tell it on the Mountain, by James Baldwin
37. The World According to Garp, by John Irving
38. All the King’s Men, by Robert Penn Warren
39. A Room with a View, by E.M. Forster
40. The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien
41. Schindler’s List, by Thomas Keneally
42. The Age of Innocence, by Edith Wharton
43. The Fountainhead, by Ayn Rand
44. Finnegans Wake, by James Joyce
45. The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair
46. Mrs. Dalloway, by Virginia Woolf
47. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum
48. Lady Chatterley’s Lover, by D.H. Lawrence
49. A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess
50. The Awakening, by Kate Chopin
51. My Antonia, by Willa Cather
52. Howards End, by E.M. Forster
53. In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote
54. Franny and Zooey, by J.D. Salinger
55. The Satanic Verses, by Salman Rushdie
56. Jazz, by Toni Morrison
57. Sophie’s Choice, by William Styron
58. Absalom, Absalom!, by William Faulkner
59. A Passage to India, by E.M. Forster
60. Ethan Frome, by Edith Wharton
61. A Good Man Is Hard to Find, by Flannery O’Connor
62. Tender Is the Night, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
63. Orlando, by Virginia Woolf
64. Sons and Lovers, by D.H. Lawrence
65. Bonfire of the Vanities, by Tom Wolfe
66. Cat’s Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut
67. A Separate Peace, by John Knowles
68. Light in August, by William Faulkner
69. The Wings of the Dove, by Henry James
70. Things Fall Apart, by Chinua Achebe
71. Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier
72. A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams
73. Naked Lunch, by William S. Burroughs
74. Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh
75. Women in Love, by D.H. Lawrence

76. Look Homeward, Angel, by Thomas Wolfe
77. In Our Time, by Ernest Hemingway
78. The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, by Gertrude Stein
79. The Maltese Falcon, by Dashiell Hammett
80. The Naked and the Dead, by Norman Mailer
81. Wide Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys
82. White Noise, by Don DeLillo
83. O Pioneers!, by Willa Cather
84. Tropic of Cancer, by Henry Miller
85. The War of the Worlds, by H.G. Wells
86. Lord Jim, by Joseph Conrad
87. The Bostonians, by Henry James
88. An American Tragedy, by Theodore Dreiser
89. Death Comes for the Archbishop, by Willa Cather
90. The Wind in the Willows, by Kenneth Grahame
91. This Side of Paradise, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
92. Atlas Shrugged, by Ayn Rand
93. The French Lieutenant’s Woman, by John Fowles
94. Babbitt, by Sinclair Lewis
95. Kim, by Rudyard Kipling
96. The Beautiful and the Damned, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
97. Rabbit, Run, by John Updike
98. Where Angels Fear to Tread, by E.M. Forster
99. Main Street, by Sinclair Lewis
100. Midnight’s Children, by Salman Rushdie

How are you celebrating Banned Books Week 2010?

ImprovEverywhere’s Ghostbusters Library Promo

A fun promo for New York Public Library: Thanks ImprovEverywhere!

Want to see more library promos with movie or tv themes? Check out the Musings About Librarianship top twelve list.

The Social Network: Trailer Parodies & The Digital Divide

Web 2.0 is so pervasive it has really hit the mainstream (I know, it is a huge understatement), with movies such as David Fincher’s The Social Network coming soon, and already getting the full Web 2.0 treatment with abundant trailer parodies on YouTube, my favorite being the Twitter Movie Trailer: Rated Awesome from Indy Mogul.*

An interesting question for me regarding the audience of the movie itself and of course that of the parodies by default, is if there is a digital divide built in, and what this might mean. Yesterday, I actually met a charming twenty-something gal, who is not on Facebook, and I was a bit shocked. Tattooed and fashionable, I felt sure she would be totally plugged in. Perhaps she is a neo-luddite. Or perhaps she just doesn’t own a computer. Who knows, but I seriously doubt this movie or the delightful parodies of the trailer will resonate with her. Either way, the divide between the haves and have nots is certainly apparent when thinking about the potential audience of The Social Network.

*Thanks to GeekSugar for showcasing the Twitter and YouTube parodies of The Social Network trailer on the GeekSugar blog.

Getting Technical at the Library

Did you know that there are more public libraries offering free technology training than there are businesses offering technology training?

Library and technology class graphic

Libraries rule.

Library resources support learning new technologies.

“More libraries—5,400—offer technology training classes than there are computer training businesses in the U.S. Every day, 14,700 people attend free library computer classes—a retail value of $2.2 million. That’s $629 million worth of computer classes annually (based on 286 business days per year)” (ALA, 2009; OCLC, 2010; ReferenceUSA Business & Residential Directory; Geek Squad).
For more public library factoids, please visit OCLC‘s How Libraries Stack Up: 2010.

“Oregon Trail: The Movie” & The Place of Gaming in Libraries

Do you remember the educational game “Oregon Trail” from your grade school days? Well, thanks* to the folks over at Half Day Today, you can imagine a live action version of the high stakes ups and downs of life (and death) along the Oregon Trail with their “faux” movie trailer on YouTube.

Half Day Today:

In 1864, a family embarks on an impossible journey into the untamed American West. Based on the classic educational computer game, The Oregon Trail by MECC.

As a kid, I remember dying to go to the computer lab where we played Oregon Trail. In the 1980s, classrooms didn’t yet have computers of their own. But I loved playing that game (so much so that when my husband found the game app for our BlackBerries, I enthusiastically downloaded it for our young nieces and nephews to play). It was such an innovative way to capture the attention of 4th graders (or whatever grade I was in). And I took it so seriously and was so disappointed when we all died of dysentery or broken legs and didn’t make it to Oregon. How very tragic. I’m not sure that I really learned a lot about the pioneer spirit or the pioneer reality, but I certainly did have my imagination captured by technology, so really I learned something else, indirectly through the experience: that technology is cool and can be fun.

At around this same time, I discovered the MS-DOS based version of the game Adventure (aka Colossal Cave, Colossal Cave Adventure, or ADVENT). I loved it, and spent hours trying to map out the cave on huge sheets of drawing paper (this method did not work very well, as I never really could tell where the neighboring cave rooms should be). I think it just goes to show, and here is my big library tie in, that new technologies, gaming, and environments such as Second Life really can capture the imagination of kids, and libraries do and will have a place in providing some of this, through education and outreach.

*Special thanks to Mashable for their tweet directing me to their blog post about the trailer.

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Related Articles & Posts:

Classic Gaming’s Apple II Game of the Week: Oregon Trail

Digital Humanities Quarterly’s Somewhere Nearby is Colossal Cave: Examining Will Crowther’s Original “Adventure” in Code and in Kentucky

Mashable’s Faux “Oregon Trail: The Movie” Trailer Hits the Web [VIDEO]

Nicholson, Scott. (2007). The Role of Gaming in Libraries: Taking the Pulse. White paper available online at http://boardgameswithscott.com/pulse2007.pdf

Job Seeking Help and the Public Library

Did you know that 300,000 Americans visit public libraries daily for job seeking help?

Americans use library services for job seeking graphic

Public libraries rule.

In economic times such as these, those facing the digital divide continue to turn to their libraries for access to the internet. Tough times lead to tough choices, and it seems likely to me that the digital divide has grown as income loss might lead some to choose to cancel services such as home Internet access. Cable and phone bills can be expensive, and when you are struggling to make ends meet, you cut back where you can. This means more people will turn to their public library (0r Internet cafe) in order to use on site Wi-Fi with a laptop, or use the machines provided by the library computer lab or work station. Those who aren’t using computers directly for job-seeking are able to stay in touch with friends and family, network, explore, learn, and contribute in the Web 2.o (3.0?) world. Computers are a necessity for job-seekers today, and public libraries provide access.

For other public library factoids, visit OCLC‘s report How Libraries Stack Up: 2010.

UPDATE 8/2/2010 5:19pm PST

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Related Articles & Posts:

San Francisco Chronicle: Libraries Branch Out Into Job-Hunting Centers