LIS Lady, Stephanie Roach, explores social media use by groups of info pros in poster session at CLA conference

Social media use infographicNovember 3, 2012 I presented a poster session, Social Media Use in the Bay Area Library Student and Professional Community, at the California Library Association’s annual conference in San Jose, CA. The session felt like a success. The survey results and data analysis as well as the poster infographic are available on the LIS Lady website.

Abstract

Social Media Use in the Bay Area Library Student and Professional Community explores the use of social media by San Francisco Bay Area professional networking groups. Social media platforms including Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, and Pinterest will be evaluated for social media presence by library professional groups. Specific strategies in use by group administrators will be identified, and use of platform specific tools such as timelines, events, hangouts, etc. This poster session establishes a baseline for use of social media by San Francisco Bay Area library professional groups, and serves as an exploratory study providing data revealing directions for future research.

The poster session includes figures quantifying use of social media by San Francisco Bay Area library student and professional groups. Group administrators were surveyed to discover strategies and methods for utilizing social media platforms, and group profiles were evaluated to discover which tools are being utilized.

Poster Session Proposal Accepted by California Library Association – Social Media Use Among LIS Groups #CLA12 #defygravity

Aside

Good news!

My poster session proposal was accepted for the California Library Association‘s 2012 annual conference. I’ll be doing research on use of social media by San Francisco Bay Area student and professional groups in the library and information science community.

More details to come soon!

Conference Logo - Defying Gravity - CLA Annual Conference and Exhibition 2012

Daphne Koller: What We’re Learning from Online Education #TED

Daphne Koller talks about the potential of distributed education and massive open online courses.

Daphne Koller:

There are some tremendous opportunities to be had from this kind of framework. The first is that it has the potential of giving us a completely unprecedented look into understanding human learning. Because the data that we can collect here is unique. You can collect every click, every homework submission, every forum post from tens of thousands of students. So you can turn the study of human learning from the hypothesis-driven mode to the data-driven mode, a transformation that, for example, has revolutionized biology. You can use these data to understand fundamental questions like, what are good learning strategies that are effective versus ones that are not? And in the context of particular courses, you can ask questions like, what are some of the misconceptions that are more common and how do we help students fix them?

Grapes of Wrath, Technology, Research, and Dramaturgy

My dramaturgical project at Chabot College’s Department of Theater Arts is keeping me quite busy. Since the beginning of the project, I’ve observed auditions, met the company, attended a few rehearsals, begun research, and am putting together a “look book” for the use of the director, cast and crew. What a wonderful opportunity to bring together my love of theater and literature with my professional ambitions as a researcher/librarian. Further, I get to put it all together in a blog format, for which I’m creating a taxonomy that keeps it organized and easily searchable in ways that relate specifically to the production of the play, and hopefully make it more useful and accessible as a company resource.

One of my goals with this project is to bring the information I find to the students involved in the production of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath where they play out their virtual lives and in formats they will use online. Most communication outside of the rehearsal process is via Facebook. In addition to posting information on the Grapes of Wrath blog, information goes up on Twitter (#ChabotTheater) and of course, on the company Facebook group page. YouTube and other video sources have also proved valuable.

Fortunately, many wonderful images are available from the Library of Congress, as part of the Farm Security Administration-Office of War Information (FSA-OWI) images found in the American Memory Collection: America from the Great Depression to WWII: Black and White Photographs from the FSA-OWI 1935-1945. This is an excellent resource that is primarily in the public domain because most of the images are government documents photographed by government employees. And of course, so many of the images from this collection have become iconic, such as the image below by Dorothea Lange.

Dorothea Lange. 1936. Migrant Mother Series. Reproduction number: LC-USF34-9058-C (film negative).

"Destitute peapickers in California; a 32 year old mother of seven children. February 1936." (retouched version)

League of Librarians Trading Cards and QR Codes

League of Librarians: Nora Dimmock, Film Studies Librarian

League of Librarians Trading Card.

Kudos to River Campus Libraries of the University of Rochester for their creative use of Quick Response Codes paired with interesting graphics to dress up their business cards.

Contact information and a Quick Response or “QR” Code was provided on the reverse, making the trading card an essential and creative business card as well. Raised Connection’s “Connection Card” is one example of this trend, and the following YouTube video shows how it works.

Remember, QR Codes can connect someone to more than contact information. Images, web pages, blogs and other content online that can be viewed on a smart phone or on a computer can be embedded in the QR Code.

Other ways that academic libraries are using QR Codes can be found in Library Journal’s online article ALA Midwinter 2011: Straight from the Stacks to the Smartphone. Other specific examples include University of San Francisco’s Gleeson Library and UC Berkeley Libraries.

What do you need to create and read a QR Code?

QR Code generators can be found online, examples include Kaywa (which also has a reader) and Jaxo. Further recommendations for QR Code generators and readers can be found in the 2D Code articles, QR Code Generators and QR Code Readers. I use ScanLife on my Blackberry Storm, and it works great. I’m sure many other readers are great as well, and undoubtedly, whatever your smart phone happens to be, there’s an app for that. Here are instructions on downloading mobile QR reader software to your phone if it doesn’t come pre-installed.

Happy scanning!

Star Wars and The Reference Interview’s Open Ended Question

Star Wars Episode II (and a quarter) Attack of the Reference Question

Master Obi-Wan Kenobi’s reference interview at the Jedi Temple Library is a failure, however, a visit with Jedi master Yoda finally gets the information he needs, when better reference technique is employed. Yoda–apparently not only a mentor, but also an independent information professional–restates the information, the problem,  and then asks an open ended question:

“Lost a planet, Master Obi-Wan has. How embarrassing, how embarrassing.” – Yoda

Thanks to JennyWildcat and of course, LucasFilm and George Lucas.

YouTube video edited by Chrissy Johnson, Emporia State University, SLIM Utah 6 Cohort. Continue reading

John Steinbeck and The 1962 Nobel Prize Award Ceremony in Stockholm [Video]

John Steinbeck receives the 1962 Nobel Prize in Literature.

The 1962 Nobel Prize Award Ceremony in Stockholm – Media Player at Nobelprize.org

The 1962 Nobel Prizes were delivered on 10 December 1962, in a glittering ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall, to four British scientists, an American professor and an American novelist. The 80-year old Swedish King Gustaf VI Adolf presented each recipient with a Nobel Medal and Diploma: for Chemistry to Max F. Perutz and John C. Kendrew; for Physiology or Medicine to Francis Crick, James Watson and Maurice Wilkins; and for Literature to John Steinbeck.

No sound, 1 minute.

I am beginning my research as dramaturge for the Spring 2011 production of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath by Frank Galati. Directed by Dov Hassan for the Chabot College Department of Theater Arts.

More updates to come!

Continue reading

Slacktivists Unite: Does Your Facebook Profile Picture Matter?

So, many of my Facebook friends have taken up the call to raise awareness about domestic violence against children by replacing their profile picture with an image of their favorite cartoon character from childhood. This act is supposed to evoke the childhood memories lost by child victims of domestic violence. It is a noble cause and should be supported.

However, my twitter stream has shown that some recognize a problem with this type of social activism via the weak ties social network that is Facebook. It is one thing to agree with the message of a cause, and spend ten seconds changing your profile picture or status message. However, it is entirely another thing to feel incentivized to donate time or money, or even take bigger risks for the sake of a worthy cause. Here are some examples of tweets pointing to this:

@BookishJulia Julia Skinner
Not changing my FB picture. Raising awareness is only helpful if it transfers to meaningful action, rather than an excuse for inaction.
@pnkrcklibrarian Punk.Rock.Librarian. [Lisa Rabey]
Just posted on FB why I think the change your profile pic is dumb. How many guesses how many people will de-friend with that statement?
Both tweets got a lot of responses. Lisa Rabey elaborates in the following exchange with Ian Clark:
LR: @ijclark ANd I get irritated when people “support” a cause but don’t acutally do anything to SUPPORT a cause. Also: http://on.fb.me/e9bUVu
LR: @ijclark Because most, actually a lot, assume profile->cartoon pic swap “teehee let’s remember childhood” not “swap to stop child abuse!”
IC: @pnkrcklibrarian I’m right with you there….changing your photo isn’t on its own going to achieve anything. At least if they donate as well
I was discussing this topic with friends last night, and it put me in mind of a couple of articles that I’ve read recently: The first, Small Change: Why the Revolution will not be Tweeted, by Malcolm Gladwell, compares strong ties social network triggered activism like that seen in the 1960s civil rights era with that of weak ties social network triggered activism on Facebook and Twitter; and the second, How to: Turn Slacktivists into Activists with Social Media, by Geoff Livingston, is about taking “slacktivism” and transforming it into activism.
The worry seems to be that people who engage in slacktivist tactics will believe they are doing enough just by changing their profile picture or status. And there is undoubtedly truth to that. Although not based on research, and only an observation, it is completely possible that the idea young people have of what activism is and can be, what it can achieve, has changed.
I think what is important to remember is that not everybody is an activist, and not everybody who is an activist is an activist for all causes. However, this does not mean that massive low level engagement, or “slacktivism” won’t spread the word and trigger a few people who are more engaged with an issue to a higher level of activism, or at least spark a conversation (this instance on Facebook with cartoon profile pictures certainly has triggered a conversation on Twitter, although it isn’t a conversation about child abuse or domestic violence). Still, might not this be worth it, if one person more is inspired to act?
So, what can you do? Visit one of the following websites, and learn about domestic violence against children. Contribute your time and energy to the cause. Or, if all you can manage is a tweet or status update, let others know where they can go to make a real difference.
Children’s Defense Fund: http://www.childrensdefense.org/
Child Welfare League of America: http://www.cwla.org/
National Coalition Against Domestic Violence: http://www.ncadv.org/