League of Librarians Trading Cards and QR Codes

League of Librarians: Nora Dimmock, Film Studies Librarian

League of Librarians Trading Card.

Kudos to River Campus Libraries of the University of Rochester for their creative use of Quick Response Codes paired with interesting graphics to dress up their business cards.

Contact information and a Quick Response or “QR” Code was provided on the reverse, making the trading card an essential and creative business card as well. Raised Connection’s “Connection Card” is one example of this trend, and the following YouTube video shows how it works.

Remember, QR Codes can connect someone to more than contact information. Images, web pages, blogs and other content online that can be viewed on a smart phone or on a computer can be embedded in the QR Code.

Other ways that academic libraries are using QR Codes can be found in Library Journal’s online article ALA Midwinter 2011: Straight from the Stacks to the Smartphone. Other specific examples include University of San Francisco’s Gleeson Library and UC Berkeley Libraries.

What do you need to create and read a QR Code?

QR Code generators can be found online, examples include Kaywa (which also has a reader) and Jaxo. Further recommendations for QR Code generators and readers can be found in the 2D Code articles, QR Code Generators and QR Code Readers. I use ScanLife on my Blackberry Storm, and it works great. I’m sure many other readers are great as well, and undoubtedly, whatever your smart phone happens to be, there’s an app for that. Here are instructions on downloading mobile QR reader software to your phone if it doesn’t come pre-installed.

Happy scanning!

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Field Trip: USF’s Gleeson Library

Oh, I’m so excited! I have a field trip today. My internship site supervisor and I are going to the Gleeson Library at USF in order to research the history and other details of the Jesuit Tape Collection which is housed at the Graduate Theological Union library in Berkeley.

Hopefully we will get some good information that will help to clear up some of the copyright concerns that have been plaguing the progress of the digitization project. Really, I think some fresh information might give us a new direction and more importantly, new contacts.

Well, I must plan my trip into the city! I will update with more details later. Continue reading