League of Librarians Trading Cards and QR Codes

League of Librarians: Nora Dimmock, Film Studies Librarian

League of Librarians Trading Card.

Kudos to River Campus Libraries of the University of Rochester for their creative use of Quick Response Codes paired with interesting graphics to dress up their business cards.

Contact information and a Quick Response or “QR” Code was provided on the reverse, making the trading card an essential and creative business card as well. Raised Connection’s “Connection Card” is one example of this trend, and the following YouTube video shows how it works.

Remember, QR Codes can connect someone to more than contact information. Images, web pages, blogs and other content online that can be viewed on a smart phone or on a computer can be embedded in the QR Code.

Other ways that academic libraries are using QR Codes can be found in Library Journal’s online article ALA Midwinter 2011: Straight from the Stacks to the Smartphone. Other specific examples include University of San Francisco’s Gleeson Library and UC Berkeley Libraries.

What do you need to create and read a QR Code?

QR Code generators can be found online, examples include Kaywa (which also has a reader) and Jaxo. Further recommendations for QR Code generators and readers can be found in the 2D Code articles, QR Code Generators and QR Code Readers. I use ScanLife on my Blackberry Storm, and it works great. I’m sure many other readers are great as well, and undoubtedly, whatever your smart phone happens to be, there’s an app for that. Here are instructions on downloading mobile QR reader software to your phone if it doesn’t come pre-installed.

Happy scanning!

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Star Wars and The Reference Interview’s Open Ended Question

Star Wars Episode II (and a quarter) Attack of the Reference Question

Master Obi-Wan Kenobi’s reference interview at the Jedi Temple Library is a failure, however, a visit with Jedi master Yoda finally gets the information he needs, when better reference technique is employed. Yoda–apparently not only a mentor, but also an independent information professional–restates the information, the problem,  and then asks an open ended question:

“Lost a planet, Master Obi-Wan has. How embarrassing, how embarrassing.” – Yoda

Thanks to JennyWildcat and of course, LucasFilm and George Lucas.

YouTube video edited by Chrissy Johnson, Emporia State University, SLIM Utah 6 Cohort. Continue reading

ImprovEverywhere’s Ghostbusters Library Promo

A fun promo for New York Public Library: Thanks ImprovEverywhere!

Want to see more library promos with movie or tv themes? Check out the Musings About Librarianship top twelve list.

The Social Network: Trailer Parodies & The Digital Divide

Web 2.0 is so pervasive it has really hit the mainstream (I know, it is a huge understatement), with movies such as David Fincher’s The Social Network coming soon, and already getting the full Web 2.0 treatment with abundant trailer parodies on YouTube, my favorite being the Twitter Movie Trailer: Rated Awesome from Indy Mogul.*

An interesting question for me regarding the audience of the movie itself and of course that of the parodies by default, is if there is a digital divide built in, and what this might mean. Yesterday, I actually met a charming twenty-something gal, who is not on Facebook, and I was a bit shocked. Tattooed and fashionable, I felt sure she would be totally plugged in. Perhaps she is a neo-luddite. Or perhaps she just doesn’t own a computer. Who knows, but I seriously doubt this movie or the delightful parodies of the trailer will resonate with her. Either way, the divide between the haves and have nots is certainly apparent when thinking about the potential audience of The Social Network.

*Thanks to GeekSugar for showcasing the Twitter and YouTube parodies of The Social Network trailer on the GeekSugar blog.

Preserve your digital collection at home

The Library of Congress is looking out for more than just their collections of books, maps, and other holdings. Digital assets play an important and unique role for our (non-) national library, and for you at home. Taking steps to preserve them at home can save losing important files later. Here’s an easy how to:

Why Digital Preservation is Important for You

Our personal photos, papers, music and videos are important to us. They record the details of our lives and help define us. But increasingly our possessions and our communications are no longer material: they’re digital and dependent on technology to make them accessible.

As new technology emerges and current technology becomes obsolete, we need to actively manage our digital possessions to help protect them and keep them available for years to come. This video offers simple and practical strategies for personal digital preservation.

-Digital Preservation Video Series, Library of Congress

The YouTube video provides good suggestions for organizing and backing up your files–be they audio, video, photos, documents, whatever–at home with four easy steps, outlined in the Library of Congress digital preservation video:

  1. Identify files to be saved
  2. Decide/Select what is important
  3. Organize the content: Create your personal Archive!
  4. Save copies in different locations

The video is basic, but useful and clear. Happy archiving!